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NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft flew closely past distant Uranus, the seventh planet from the Sun, in January.

At its closet, the spacecraft came within 81,800 kilometers (50,600 miles) of Uranus's cloudtops on Jan. 24, 1986.

Voyager 2 radioed thousands of images and voluminous amounts of other scientific data on the planet, its moons, rings, atmosphere, interior and the magnetic environment surrounding Uranus.

For a fact sheet on the Uranus science summary, click here.

Click on the image for a larger view:

False-color view of Uranus
False-color view of Uranus
Uranus's outermost ring
Uranus's outermost ring
Uranus's moon Miranda
Uranus's moon Miranda
True-color (left) and false-color views of Uranus. January 17, 1986. Range 5.7 million miles.

True-color (left) and false-color views of Uranus. January 17, 1986. Range 5.7 million miles.
False-color composite of Uranus shows discrete cloud. January 14, 1986. Range, 8.0 million miles.
False-color composite of Uranus shows discrete cloud. January 14, 1986. Range, 8.0 million miles.
Time-lapse images show cloud movements in Uranus' atmosphere over 4.6-hour interval. January 14, 1986. Range, 8.0 million miles.
Time-lapse images show cloud movements in Uranus' atmosphere over 4.6-hour interval. January 14, 1986. Range, 8.0 million miles.
Farewell shot of crescent Uranus as Voyager 2 departs. January 25, 1986. Range 600,000 miles.
Farewell shot of crescent Uranus as Voyager 2 departs. January 25, 1986. Range 600,000 miles.
Three of the moons discovered by Voyager 2: 1986U1, 1986U3, and 1986U4. January 18, 1986. Range 4.8 million miles.
Three of the moons discovered by Voyager 2: 1986U1, 1986U3, and 1986U4. January 18, 1986. Range 4.8 million miles.
Two "shepherd" moons, 1986U7 and 1986U8, with epsilon ring. January 21, 1986. Range, 2.5 million miles.
Two "shepherd" moons, 1986U7 and 1986U8, with epsilon ring. January 21, 1986. Range, 2.5 million miles.
False-color composite of Uranus' rings (from top): epsilon, delta, gamma, eta, beta, alpha, 4, 5 and 6. January 21 1986. Range, 2.6 million miles.
False-color composite of Uranus' rings (from top): epsilon, delta, gamma, eta, beta, alpha, 4, 5 and 6. January 21 1986. Range, 2.6 million miles.
Rings of Uranus, including newly discovered 10th ring designated 1986U1R (barely visible below outermost epsilon ring). January 23, 1986. Range, 690,000 miles.
Rings of Uranus, including newly discovered 10th ring designated 1986U1R (barely visible below outermost epsilon ring). January 23, 1986. Range, 690,000 miles.
Backlit view shows continuous distribution of fine particles throughout ring system. January 24, 1986. Range, 147,000 miles.
Backlit view shows continuous distribution of fine particles throughout ring system. January 24, 1986. Range, 147,000 miles.
Heavy crate ring seen in most detailed view of Umbriel. January 24, 1986. Range, 346,000 miles.
Heavy crate ring seen in most detailed view of Umbriel. January 24, 1986. Range, 346,000 miles.
Best image of Oberon shows cratering and large peak on moon's lower limb. January 24, 1986. Range 410,000 miles.
Best image of Oberon shows cratering and large peak on moon's lower limb. January 24, 1986. Range 410,000 miles.
Mosaic of Ariel, most detailed view from Voyager 2 shows numerous faults and valleys. January 24, 1986. Range, 80,000 miles.
Mosaic of Ariel, most detailed view from Voyager 2 shows numerous faults and valleys. January 24, 1986. Range, 80,000 miles.
Highest-resolution picture of Titania displays prominent fault valleys nearly 1,000 miles long. January 24, 1986. Range, 229,000 miles.
Highest-resolution picture of Titania displays prominent fault valleys nearly 1,000 miles long. January 24, 1986. Range, 229,000 miles.
Color composite shows evidence of impact scars and past geologic activity on Titania. January 24, 1986. Range, 300,000 miles.
Color composite shows evidence of impact scars and past geologic activity on Titania. January 24, 1986. Range, 300,000 miles.
Computer mosaic of Miranda images shows varied geologic regions at high resolution. January 24, 1986. Range, 18,700 to 25,000 miles.
Computer mosaic of Miranda images shows varied geologic regions at high resolution. January 24, 1986. Range, 18,700 to 25,000 miles.
Unusual "Chevron" figure seen on approach to Miranda. January 24, 1986. Range, 26,000 miles.
Unusual "Chevron" figure seen on approach to Miranda. January 24, 1986. Range, 26,000 miles.
Varied terrain on Miranda indicates complex geologic history. January 24, 1986. Range, 21,000 miles.
Varied terrain on Miranda indicates complex geologic history. January 24, 1986. Range, 21,000 miles.
Voyager 2 image of Miranda taken shortly before closest approach. January 24, 1986. Range 19,000 miles.
Voyager 2 image of Miranda taken shortly before closest approach. January 24, 1986. Range 19,000 miles.
Miranda displays rugged, high-elevation terrain (right), lower, grooved terrain and large crater (lower left) 15 miles across. January 24, 1986. Range, 22,000 miles.
Miranda displays rugged, high-elevation terrain (right), lower, grooved terrain and large crater (lower left) 15 miles across. January 24, 1986. Range, 22,000 miles.
 
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