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In the summer of 1989, NASA's Voyager 2 became the first spacecraft to observe the planet Neptune, its final planetary target. Passing about 4,950 kilometers (3,000 miles) above Neptune's north pole, Voyager 2 made its closest approach to any planet 12 years after leaving Earth in 1977. Five hours later, Voyager 2 passed about 40,000 kilometers (25,000 miles) from Neptune's largest moon, Triton, the last solid body the spacecraft will have an opportunity to study.

For a fact sheet on Neptune science summary, click here.

Click on the image for a larger view:

Voyager image of Neptune
Voyager image of Neptune
Larger version of neptune.gif
Larger version of neptune.gif
Neptune's rings
Neptune's rings
Neptune's Great Dark Spot
Neptune's Great Dark Spot
Neptune's moon Triton
Neptune's moon Triton
Parting view of Neptune and moon Triton
Parting view of Neptune and moon Triton
False-color image of Neptune. Red areas are semitransparent haze covering planet.
False-color image of Neptune. Red areas are semitransparent haze covering planet.
Neptune's Great Dark Spot, accompanied by white high-altitude clouds.
Neptune's Great Dark Spot, accompanied by white high-altitude clouds.
Cloud systems in Neptune's southern hemisphere.
Cloud systems in Neptune's southern hemisphere.
Greak Dark Spot. This storm system rotates counterclockwise.
Greak Dark Spot. This storm system rotates counterclockwise.
High-altitude cloud streaks in Neptune's atmosphere.
High-altitude cloud streaks in Neptune's atmosphere.
Two views of satellite 1989N2. Dark, irregularly shaped moon was discovered by Voyager 2.
Two views of satellite 1989N2. Dark, irregularly shaped moon was discovered by Voyager 2.
Satellite 1989N1, discovered by Voyager 2.
Satellite 1989N1, discovered by Voyager 2.
Neptune's ring system, shown in two exposures lasting nearly 10 minutes each.
Neptune's ring system, shown in two exposures lasting nearly 10 minutes each.
Detail of Neptune's rings.
Detail of Neptune's rings.
Bright Southern hemisphere on Triton.
Bright Southern hemisphere on Triton.
View about 300 miles across of Triton's surface.
View about 300 miles across of Triton's surface.
Triton from 80,000 miles. Long feature is probably a narrow down-dropped fault block.
Triton from 80,000 miles. Long feature is probably a narrow down-dropped fault block.
Triton's sough polar terrain. About 50 dark plumes mark what may be ice volcanoes.
Triton's sough polar terrain. About 50 dark plumes mark what may be ice volcanoes.
Triton from 25,000 miles. Depressions may be caused by melting and collapsing of icy surface.
Triton from 25,000 miles. Depressions may be caused by melting and collapsing of icy surface.
High-resolution color mosaic of Triton.
High-resolution color mosaic of Triton.
Triton just after closest approach.
Triton just after closest approach.
Post-encounter view of Neptune's south pole.
Post-encounter view of Neptune's south pole.
Neptune and Triton 3 days after flyby. Triton is smaller crescent and is closer to viewer.
Neptune and Triton 3 days after flyby. Triton is smaller crescent and is closer to viewer.

 

 
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