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NEWS & ARCHIVE

Voyager Team Member Quotes

John Casani  
John Casani
Voyager Project Manager 1975-1977

 
"Voyager opened our eyes to what was out there in the solar system and provides us a compelling argument for going back with missions like Galileo, Cassini and other missions that will follow."
Chris P. Jones  
Chris P. Jones
Voyager Fault Protection Engineer (1973-1975)
Voyager Flight S/W System Engineer (1975-1977)
Voyager Spacecraft Team Chief (1978-1981)

 
"We began the MJS77 Project in 1973 with a stripped down version of the high-tech Outer Planets Grand Tour mission. From those humble beginnings, the two intrepid explorers named Voyager have generated a national pride and identity. Today they're recognizable by all age groups, and no wonder. One can find them referenced in school science texts, in a prominent role in an old Star Trek movie, and even in an image subtly placed on a Moody Blues album cover."
Charley Kohlhase  
Charley Kohlhase
Mission Analysis and Engineering Manager (1974-1977)

 
"Even in hindsight, I would not change one whit of the Voyager experience. Dreams and sweat carried it off. But most of all, its legacy makes us all Earth travelers among the stars."
Peter T. Poon  
Dr. Peter T. Poon
Telecommunications & Mission Systems Manager (2004-Present)

 
"What an outstanding mission Voyager is! I marvel at the wealth of scientific discoveries of Voyager which lead to the greatly expanded knowledge of our Solar System. I enjoy being a part of the team and appreciate the long-term partnership between Voyager and the Deep Space Network."
Edward C. Stone  
Dr. Edward C. Stone
Voyager Project Scientist (1972-Present)

 
"The Voyager mission has opened up our solar system in a way not possible before the Space Age." "It revealed our neighbors in the outer solar system and showed us how much there is to learn and how diverse the bodies are that share the solar system with our own planet Earth."
Harris Schurmeier  
Harris Schurmeier
Voyager Project Manager (1970-1976)

 
"There were and still are many remarkable and amazing things about Voyager but to me the most remarkable was the timing. The planetary alignment that occurs only once every 175 years occurred at the time we were ready and able to do the mission. The necessary technologies were developed - communications, navigation, power, electronics, attitude control, instruments. The scientists were experienced. There was strong public support. We could not have done it 5 years earlier and 5 years later the politics would not have supported it."
Alan Stern  
Alan Stern
Associate Administrator NASA's Science Mission Directorate (2007-Present)

 
"The Voyager mission is a legend in the annals of space exploration. It opened our eyes to the scientific richness of the outer solar system, and it has pioneered the deepest exploration of the sun's domain ever conducted. "It's a testament to Voyager's designers, builders and operators that both spacecraft continue to deliver important findings more than 25 years after their primary mission to Jupiter and Saturn concluded."
Stamatios M. Krimigis  
Stamatios M. Krimigis
Principal Investigator, Low Energy Charged Particle Instrument (1971-Present)

 
"What became my love affair with Voyager began more than 37 years ago, when the project was invented as the Outer Planets Grand Tour and I was appointed a member of the Mission Definition Team. Soon after that proposals were invited by NASA, and in 1971 I was selected as PI to build the LECP instrument we had proposed with a number of other (young) colleagues (I was the youngest PI on the Voyager science team). Little did I know at the time what an adventure this would turn out to be. I have now been with the project for most of my carrier in space science, and I consider Voyager the highlight of my entire existence as a scientist. I also think Voyager is the most spectacular space science mission of the 20th century. Little did I know, as I was growing up on the Greek island of Chios, that some day I would be one of the few lucky people to represent humanity on the first mission that would travel beyond our solar system. This is the kind of stuff that dreams are made off-and I was fortunate enough to realize my dream!"
Trina L. Ray  
Trina L. Ray
Voyager General Science Data Team (1989-1996)

 
"My first job - working on the Voyager Project, during its last great planetary encounter. Everyone on the project had been there for years, some of them for decades; everyone knew everyone, and knew what they were supposed to be doing; everyone felt the excitement. The entire laboratory was energized, especially as blue Neptune began to grow day-by-day in the overhead displays. Some days I still can't believe that was my first job here at JPL, and as with all first jobs, it set the standard by which all others have been compared. I must say it set the bar very, very VERY high."
Ed B. Massey  
Ed B. Massey
Voyager Project Manager (1998-Present)

 
"The legacies of the Voyagers are many. Their confirmation of some and contradiction of other science concepts, surprising discoveries at every planet and the only in situ observations of Uranus and Neptune, have changed the way we view the giant gaseous planets. The Voyagers also inspired, and are still inspiring, further exploration of the outer planets. But the Voyagers have also inspired a new generation of scientists to explore the solar system. This is just as significant as the many scientific accomplishments of the venerable spacecraft."
Ellis D. Minor  
Ellis D. Minor
Voyager Assistant Project Scientist (1978-1990)

 
"... With the present emphasis on 'cheaper, better, faster' missions, NASA is unlikely to consider a return mission to Uranus (or Neptune) within the next few decades. For at least several decades, Voyager data will remain the primary source of information about Uranus (and Neptune). As of this writing, both Voyager spacecraft continue to radio back information on the particles and fields environment of the Solar System from well beyond the orbit of Pluto. ... What a marvelous legacy Voyager has left humankind. Few can imagine a more fitting testament of mankind's ability to stretch his horizons. How grateful I am that I was able to share in such an adventure."
Alan Cummings  
Alan Cummings
Voyager Project Co-Investigator, CRS (1973 - Present)

 
"My first task as an employee of Caltech was to work on our Voyager instrument -- way back in 1973. I have been working on it ever since. What a mission Voyager has been and continues to be! The planetary encounters produced numerous discoveries and surprises and now the exploration of the outer heliosphere is doing the same thing. I feel fortunate to be a part of it and excited to find out what lies ahead when the Voyagers reach interstellar space."